Frank Giovinco

 

https://www.occrp.org/en/daily/12643-new-york-mobster-sentenced-to-four-years-in-prison

 

A member of New York’s Genovese crime family was sentenced to four years in prison for extortion and racketeering conspiracies according to a statement from the US Department of Justice.

Frank Giovinco, 52, was convicted back in December after he was arrested along with several other members of the Genovese family. According to the DOJ, Giovinco’s role was to exert the mafia’s control over two unions representing the wine and liquor industry in New York City according to the National Legal and Policy Center.

“For years, Frank Giovinco, as a member of the Genovese Crime Family, instilled fear in victims and perpetrated kickback schemes to tighten the Family’s stranglehold over two labor unions.  For committing these crimes, Giovinco will now spend four years in prison,” said acting U.S. Attorney Audrey Strauss.

The Genovese family is one of the “Five Families” that dominate criminal activities in New York and New Jersey as part of the Italian-American mafia or La Cosa Nostra (Sicilian for ‘This thing of ours.’)

The family was established in the 1930’s by Charles “Lucky” Luciano, the godfather of the American mob who rose to prominence during the prohibition era and established ‘The Commission,’ the loose ruling body which delineated territory and created the current hierarchy of the Italian-American Mob.

In the 1950’s the family was renamed as Genovese, after Vito Genovese who took over the control of the family when Luciano was deported to Italy following WWII. Since then members of the group have been implicated in crimes ranging from running illegal gambling rackets to mortgage fraud.

Giovinco first came onto the scene in the 1990’s when the family inserted him into a scheme to control the waste carting industry in New York City, said the DOJ.

He rose through the ranks as an enforcer, working mainly with Brooklyn labor unions.

In more recent years, Giovinco conspired with other members and associates of the family to commit a wide range of crimes, including multiple acts of extortion, honest services fraud, and bribery, the DOJ statement said.

He manipulated and siphoned money from the two unions for the benefit of the crime family.

In that role, Giovinco was not shy about threatening violence.

“Among other things, Giovinco extorted a financial adviser and a labor union official for a cut of commissions made from union investments. Audio recordings captured Giovinco planning to ‘rattle the cage’ of a victim, and to have another victim’s ‘feet held to the fire,” according to the DOJ.

BACKGROUND: “I’m in waste management!” – Genovese Mafia family soldier Frank Giovinco guilty of racketeering

 

https://gangstersinc.ning.com/profiles/blogs/i-m-in-waste-management-genovese-mafia-family-soldier-frank-giovi

 

Genovese Mafia family mobster was convicted of racketeering on Tuesday. The jury found 52-year-old Frank Giovinco responsible for acts involving extortion, honest services fraud, and unlawful kickback payments related to the Genovese family’s control of two local chapters of a labor union.

“For years, Frank Giovinco, as a member of the Genovese crime family, instilled fear in victims and propagated kickback schemes to tighten the Family’s stranglehold over two labor unions,” U.S. Attorney Geoffrey S. Berman said. “Now, a jury has held Giovinco accountable for his crimes.”

Getting “made”

As the nephew of Joe “Joey Carpets” Giovinco, an associate in the crew of Genovese family capo Frederico “Fritzie” Giovanelli, Frank had all the right connections. He grew up on Long Island and played football in High School, before putting his physique to work for the mob. As a twenty-some-year-old He was busted for possession of stolen property, but mostly flew under the radar of law enforcement.

In the early 1990s, the Genovese family placed Giovinco in a position to control the waste carting industry in New York City. Within a few years, by the late 1990s, the family made him an official member.

His work, according to prosecutors, consisted of a wide range of crimes to enrich not only himself, but other members and leaders of the Genovese crime family. These included multiple acts of extortion, honest services fraud, and bribery.

Labor racketeering: Threats & extortion

Giovinco’s focus was on two local chapters of a labor union. He participated in a host of schemes designed to manipulate and siphon money from the unions for the benefit of the Genovese family. Among other things, he extorted a financial adviser and a labor union official for a cut of commissions made from union investments.

Audio recordings captured Giovinco planning to “rattle the cage” of a victim, and to have another victim’s “feet held to the fire.” When the union official failed to pay the commissions demanded by the Mafia, his life was threatened by Giovinco and other gangsters.

Kickbacks

Giovinco further plotted to profit from union investments by paying kickbacks to the union official and others, in exchange for a cut of future commissions. He also participated in the long-running extortion of a union president for annual tribute payments of more than $10,000, and sought a job at the union for the purpose of exerting control over the union official on the Genovese family’s behalf, and threatening to replace him if he didn’t comply.

The charges of which Giovinco was found guilty carry a maximum potential sentence of 20 years in prison, but things didn’t turn out to be severe. On June 22, 2020, Giovinco was sentenced to 4 years behind bars.

and more BACKGROUND: Genovese Crime Family Member Sentenced To 4 Years In Prison For Racketeering Offenses

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Southern District of New York

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, June 23, 2020
Genovese Crime Family Member Sentenced To Four Years In Prison For Racketeering Offenses

Audrey Strauss, the Acting United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, announced that FRANK GIOVINCO was sentenced yesterday to 48 months in prison for extortion conspiracy and participating in a racketeering conspiracy in connection with the Genovese Crime Family’s control of two local chapters of a labor union.  GIOVINCO was convicted on December 3, 2019, following a six-day trial before U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff, who also sentenced GIOVINCO.

Acting U.S. Attorney Audrey Strauss said:  “For years, Frank Giovinco, as a member of the Genovese Crime Family, instilled fear in victims and perpetrated kickback schemes to tighten the Family’s stranglehold over two labor unions.  For committing these crimes, Giovinco will now spend four years in prison.”

According to the Indictment, evidence admitted at trial, court filings, and statements made in open court:

La Cosa Nostra, also known as the “Mob” or the “Mafia,” operates through entities known as “Families.”  The largest of the families operating in the New York City area is the Genovese Crime Family.  In the early 1990s, GIOVINCO was inserted by the Genovese Crime Family into a scheme to control the waste carting industry in New York City, and as far back as the late-1990s, GIOVINCO was a member of the Genovese Crime Family.

In more recent years, and continuing until 2017, GIOVINCO conspired with other members and associates of the Genovese Crime Family to commit a wide range of crimes to enrich themselves and the Genovese Crime Family, including multiple acts of extortion, honest services fraud, and bribery.  GIOVINCO’s activity for the Genovese Crime Family was centered on two local chapters (the “Unions”) of a labor union.  GIOVINCO participated in a host of schemes designed to manipulate and siphon money from the Unions for the benefit of the Genovese Crime Family.  Among other things, GIOVINCO extorted a financial adviser (the “Adviser”) and a labor union official (“Official-1”) for a cut of commissions made from union investments.  Audio recordings captured GIOVINCO planning to “rattle the cage” of a victim, and to have another victim’s “feet held to the fire.”  When Official-1 failed to pay the commissions demanded by GIOVINCO and other members of the Genovese Crime Family, Official-1’s life was threatened by GIOVINCO and his co-conspirators.  GIOVINCO further plotted to profit from union investments by paying kickbacks to Official-1 and others, in exchange for a cut of future commissions.  GIOVINCO also participated in the long-running extortion of a union president (“Official-2”) for annual tribute payments of more than $10,000, and sought a job at the union for the purpose of exerting control over Official-1 on the Genovese Crime Family’s behalf, and threatening to replace Official-1.

*                *                *

In addition to the prison term, GIOVINCO, 52, of Syosset, New York, was sentenced to three years of supervised release.

Ms. Strauss praised the outstanding investigative work of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Inspector General and Office of Labor-Management Standards, the New York City Police Department, and the Special Agents of the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York.

The case is being prosecuted by the Office’s Violent and Organized Crime Unit.  Assistant U.S. Attorneys Kimberly J. Ravener, Jason A. Richman, and Justin V. Rodriguez are in charge of the prosecution.